Fight Team Leeds

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Fight Team Leeds

June 2018

Fight team leeds

Dom boxing bout

Fight Team Leeds 2018 June

We attended the Strike Series event K1 & Kickboxing show in Leeds this June. Nicely run show with the largest chandelier you’ve ever seen.

Four of the team were competing on the show and training camp was a gruelling 8 weeks that paid off.

Fight Team Leeds – Alfie

fight team leeds

Alfies knockout shot

Alfie Lewis – was first up for his second K1 kickboxing bout. Round 1 could have been scored either way, both fighters went 100% and it was hard to score.

For round 2 the corner crew gave Alfie some guidance, he went back in and knocked out his opponent with a round kick to the head. Watching him execute the knockout shot was no different than watching him in training. He simply applied the training drills and game plan and boooom.

Fight Team Leeds – Billy

Win for Billy

Billys second show, he fought a tough K1 Kickboxing fight. It went all three rounds though he dominated them all, it was a battle.

His opponent was up for a fight and he was no push over. But in the end the judges scored it a unanimous win for Billy. Heavy hits from both fighters.

Fight Team Leeds – Tom

fight team leeds

Loss for Tom

Tom fought a fantastic K1 Kickboxing fight, very technical and a great attitude. Sadly he got knocked out in the second round but overall Toms fight showed a great mix. Technique, posture, ring craft, aggression accuracy. It was all there and a true pleasure to watch.

He landed so many well timed shots, knees, kick punches. Everything set up, everything followed up.

Happy days, a fine loss

Fight Team Leeds – Dom

fight team leeds

Doms first boxing bout a draw

Well this was feisty and very exciting. Doms first boxing bout and what fun he had. Tough tough opponent, really swinging some bombs and taking some punishment well.

I’ll not mention the floss dancing Dom seemed to be doing.

All three rounds were like a Rocky movie, the crowd were going insane, the mix of technique and fight brawl mash up were such fun to watch.

The judges scored it a draw and we were all happy with the outcome.

SOME RAMBLINGS

 

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Martial Arts Breed Violence?

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Martial Arts Breed Violence?

Poppycock 

Martial Arts Breed Violence, this is something we hear a lot.

martial arts breed violence

Often dad brings the kids along and raises concerns that mum believes Martial Arts Breed Violence.

It’s simply not true, ok there might be a small percentage of children that confuse the message early on. Though with good coaching this will be dealt with quickly, and yes, of course, there is always the exception.

Psychopaths make up 1% of the population so knowing that, one in a hundred, well maybe Military school ASAP.

Martial Arts Breed Violence – Play Circuit

Dr. Jaak Panksepp, a neuroscientist, psychologist and psychobiologist has written extensively about the importance of play. He discovered the motivations that the play circuit develops in kids and adults.

Some believe this work to be so important a discovery that the Nobel prize is fitting.

Martial arts develops the play circuit in children and adults. Rough and tumble play clearly defines the differences between aggression and assertiveness. While playing, supervised as in a martial arts classroom setting. Or alone with friends, an extremely important distinction. Children learn what boundaries are acceptable to the group and what is aggression and what is assertiveness.

Martial Arts Breed Violence – Ethics

Play also develops ethics. Martial arts develops ethics and fair play. Games, the classroom, the dojo. Well, there are rules, mostly unspoken otherwise the academy would be wall to wall posters and rules and that’s not much fun for anyone.

Over time the rules of the group, the culture become clear. People that don’t abide by the rules or ethics generally are not accepted into the group. We do get a few of these in the club every now and then, they simply find another club where their behaviour is acceptable, and that’s how society functions.

From street gangs to Olympic teams, the culture of the group dictates.

Martial Arts Breed Violence – Nonsense

No, is basically the answer to “Do Martial Arts Breed Violence”?

But we get it, on the surface, it can appear as if it does.

Remember – It’s better to be a warrior in the garden than a gardener on the battlefield. 

MORE RAMBLINGS

 

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Muay Thai Seminar

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Muay Thai Seminar

Saturday 16th June 2.30pm

Matt Chapman is back to deliver his Muay Thai system

Those of you who attended his punch power seminar need no introduction.

Matt is a fantastic well rounded martial artist with knowledge beyond his years

  • The seminar is 2 hours
  • Seminar costs £20
  • Book your place in advance
  • No pay on the day


Matt has written books on MMA, Kickboxing and has a hugely popular online training course in the striking arts Mitt Master

muay thai seminar

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Martial Arts Flow Drills

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Martial Arts Flow Drills

Martial arts flow drills are but one way, there are multiple ways to train martial arts and over the next few weeks I’ll cover some of them.

All are useful, some you’ll prefer. But don’t just stick with the ones you like. Get out of your comfort zone and grind it out.

Martial Arts Flow Drills

Martial Arts Flow Drills – Tools to enhance

Flow drills can be used in all arts, kickboxing, Jiu-Jitsu, Self defence and so on.

What I personally like about flow drills is once you have the drill memorised. You have the freedom to flow and see opportunities inside the work. When you are shown new work, techniques etc, you are too busy just trying to remember where your hands should be or remember to breathe. If you train you know what I mean eh.

Martial Arts Flow Drills – The basics

I’ll use a Self-defence MMA example here.

In pairs, it would go something like this. Strikes, takedown, ground position, counter, strikes on ground, submission, escape, back to feet. REPEAT left and right reference.

Now we have the flow we can begin to study

Martial Arts Flow Drills – Study time

Once the drill basics are memorised you are free to flow. Now once you are flowing you’ll see things appear. Your mind free’s up enabling you to see things you’d normally miss.

It’s a wonderful learning experience if you relax and go with it. Now finding a great training partner who’s not trying to crush you is the hardest bit.

Martial Arts Flow Drills – Royalise it all as my BJJ coach John Will says

We have the flow drill, we are finding things we couldn’t see before. Now what?

Now we take out one part of the drill, say an armbar. We work on the armbar until every detail is world class. We drill it in isolation thousands of times.

Then when its Olympic gold standard we drop it back into the flow drill. A wonderful thing now happens. The rest of the drill looks shabby in comparison. Like when you buy a new pair of shoes and your clothes look scruffy, the nightmare of many an old punk rocker. So what to do?

Royalise the lot, over time you make the flow drill world class, do that and hey presto you’re getting good.

MORE MUSINGS

Next week Chaos drills followed by shadow drills

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Hard Work Sweat And Tears

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Hard Work Sweat And Tears

A simple list of must-read books if you’re interested in performance and improvement for self and others.

By no means complete, there are many many others

Carol Dweck- Mindset

“Dweck reveals what all great parents, teachers, CEOs, and athletes already know: how a simple idea about the brain can create a love of learning and a resilience that is the basis of great accomplishment in every area.”

Matthew Syed – Bounce

‘I love this book. A must-read if you have ever wondered what sets the super-achievers and the rest of us apart – in any field, not just in sport. I only wish I had read it when I was fifteen.’ Gabby Logan, BBC presenter and former international gymnast

Daniel Coyle – The Talent Code

Talent. You’ve either got it or you haven’t.’ Not true, actually.

Daniel Coyle – The Little Book Of Talent

The Little Book of Talent” should be given to every graduate at commencement, every new parent in a delivery room, every executive on the first day of work. It is a guidebook–beautiful in its simplicity and backed by hard science–for nurturing excellence.”Charles Duhigg, bestselling author of “The Power of Habit”

Malcolm Gladwell – Outliers

Why do some people achieve so much more than others? Can they lie so far out of the ordinary? Malcolm Gladwell looks at everyone from rock stars to scientific geniuses to show that the story of success is far more surprising, and inspiring, than we ever imagined.

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Making Changes

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Making Changes

making changes

It can seem overwhelming at times. You don’t know what to do first, is it correct and how do you know?

Let’s look at nutrition, it’s a minefield out there, where to begin?

Making Changes – What’s your output?

First off what are you outputting? Are you running three marathons a week or sofa surfing?

I’ve seen many people crash and burn who train hard then ramp up the routine. Say for a competition, they often neglect the nutrition which of course needs to meet training requirements.

So if you’re training as a hobby 2-4 hours a week. Then simply clean up your food, eat non processed food and cut out the rubbish, you know what that is.

Making Changes – Fuel source

Let’s be clear, I’m no expert though I do deal with lots of people training hard and helping them find the correct balance. We do ok.

I always start with this. What are your ratios of carbs, protein and fat?

We work on this for some weeks until we find good energy levels

Then we add fasting, super simple. Don’t eat after 6-7pm and breakfast 9-10am

Making Changes – Repair time

So while your fasting/sleeping your body has time to recover. This is when the important work is done.

Increase in muscle mass from fasting has been well documented and the evidence is available on that.

While fasting/sleeping your body goes through various stages of repair and recovery that are important if you are training hard. Even if you’re not, it’s important.

Making Changes – Takes time

This is where most fail. It takes time.

Let’s say you have been living in doughnuts and coffee for 10 years. Then every cell in your body has been created from that fuel source. It’s going to take time to change and the effects will be small over time. Sometimes so small you won’t feel it. That doesn’t mean it’s not working.

Every single cell in your body will regenerate in the next seven years. You are physically a completely different person. Eating well and looking after yourself is not a quick fix. Eat well for the next 10 years and every single cell you are made of has been made on a different fuel than the doughnut 10.

Hopefully you feel amazing, either way, you are building a Formula 1 car not a banger racer that you scarp after one race.

OTHER RAMBLINGS

  1. SPARRING CULTURE
  2. SELF DEFENCE
  3. FASTING VIDEO
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How Gradings Work

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How Gradings Work

How Gradings Work

How Gradings Work – At Function First Martial Arts

Every now and then a student will ask about gradings. Or why there are people in an advanced group and they are not. We figure if one is asking then many more are thinking the same. So we feel we’re not getting the message across well enough.

Heres an attempt to address that

How Gradings Work – Process

Grades are every three months

Year 1 = Yellow – Red – Orange – Green Grades

Year 2 = Blue and above grades

Little Vipers age 5-8. This is nice and simple, we don’t pressure the kids at this age too much. Vipers need to complete twelve classes, so once a week between grades.

Cadets aged 9-14.

Year one is like the little vipers. Once a week meaning twelve classes between grades is sufficient.

Year 2. Now we ramp up the pressure a little. In year two cadets really need to be training twice a week and averaging 24 classes between grades. Kids who train once a week at this level struggle to retain the information so we grade them every 6-9 months. Unfortunately they fall behind a little, and this often develops into a defeatist attitude. They often seem to lose interest and leave. If we look at all our year three cadets virtually 100% of them train two or more times a week. Those who stick with it the longest are the ones who experience the growth and benefits.

Adults. All adult classes require a minimum of 2 classes a week to grade.

It is worth pointing out that those that train twice a week develop the skills at a much faster rate than those who train once a week. We have some kids that train 6 hours a week and compete, I think it goes without saying. Their confidence and attitude are unlike other kids of their age. They are formidable capable young people who walk shoulders back and head held high.

How Gradings Work – What counts?

Class attendance is important as it develops good habits. Though this alone is not enough, we grade on attitude and work ethic.

In year one for all our students, we are fairly relaxed. We want you to figure out if this is something you wish to take seriously. The work becomes more complex in year two and one class a week is no longer sufficient to remember the work.

Now we understand that some simply cannot make it in more than once a week. If it’s other hobbies getting in the way or were getting in the way of other hobbies. Then we advise picking one and studying deep as the benefits are profound if you allow them to be.

Of course one hour a week is better than none, though two hours a week is a 100% improvement. Twice the growth in a year, well actually it’s like compound interest. It exponentially develops so you end up accelerating your learning at a much faster rate over time.

Exactly the same as if you put £100 a week into a savings account and I put £200 in. After one year I would have more than double because of interest, over time this makes a massive difference.

A £10,000 investment with a 20% return each month over 3 years earns you over £20,000,000 yes 20 million pounds.

Martial arts repetitions are exactly the same.

How Gradings Work – Don’t grade?

So if you don’t grade then you stay in year one of our syllabus and repeat the same work. This, of course, is fine, it just means you never get to progress to the more complex work and close quarter clinch work of the kickboxing for example.

Once you have completed all four grades you move into the next group and cover the more advanced work from the syllabus.

Its an old cliche but there is some truth to it. Jack of all trades master of none.

Master one and you have insight into the self that others do not. You grasp concepts and see patterns that give you an edge in life.

Off The Mats As On

OTHER RAMBLINGS

 

 

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Self Defence Lincoln The Un Real Deal

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Self Defence Lincoln The Un Real Deal 

Delusion Illusion Confusion

Self Defence Lincoln The Un Real Deal

The Un Real Deal Self Defence Lincoln

My Self Defence is the best he said

Self Defence Lincoln The Un Real Deal – We hear it all the time

If you train self-defence then you have heard this a million times

“My self-defence is the most realistic”

OR

“Insert system here, is the best self-defence there is”

Self Defence Lincoln The Un Real Deal – Question

So yours is the best, exactly how many systems have you trained in and how do you actually decide?

It’s like every coffee shop in the world has the poster in the window

Self Defence Lincoln The Un Real Deal

Its true i tell you

Self Defence Lincoln The Un Real Deal – Tested

So every other sport pretty much has a league or a title belt or a gold medalist etc. We have measurement systems in place to decide what actually is or who is the best in the world and it’s as good as it gets currently. Like it or not there are winners and losers and there are ultimate champions and to take that belt, the trophy from them you have to beat them.

Self Defence Lincoln The Un Real Deal – Be nice

Don’t get me wrong, I’m not dissing other systems. I love most of the other arts that are about, I’ve trained in many. Though when i hear thee statements, it’s like saying “I have the greatest toenail clipping system in the world, I’m the best there is” It sort of means nothing in the grand scheme of things.

Self Defence Lincoln The Un Real Deal – Enjoyment

If you are enjoying the training, breaking a sweat and having fun then you’re onto a good thing. Building friendships and camaraderie are important and much lacking as adults.

So don’t try to measure the unmeasurable, be happy your active and humble

If you really want to find out what works simply apply to compete in “name an art” and see how you do, win or lose it’s all good.

OTHER MUSINGS

 

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Function First Black Belts

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Function First Black Belts

We Reward Hard Work

Function First Black Belts – We Give Back

So if you’re a Black Belt with us you’ve been training for a few years

You have shown commitment and loyalty and we recognise how important that is in the world

Because we value these attributes we reward them

Function First Black Belts – Free Training

Once you receive your Black Belt you are invited to join our Black Belt club

We upgrade you for free to the BB Club

Now unlike most other clubs, this is not something we charge extra for, we do not ask you to pay when you have shown true commitment.

Saturdays are Black Belt training days. We meet at 2.30 pm and train until 4 pm

We upgrade you for free to the Black Belt Club, our gift to you for what we consider to be important values in the world. 

Function First Black Belts – Skill Development

We coach you how to develop your own work, a much-neglected area in the arts.

Learning how to create drills that flow logically and with natural progressive movement is an important skill that can be transferred to the rest of life

function first black belts

Function First Black Belts – Invisible doors

We believe in life invisible doors open for those who act with passion and commitment. We believe that unless the organisation is corrupt this is an integral feature of the working world.

We are all surrounded by invisible doors, they open when least expected but there are factors at play that open them. People talk about you, people notice behaviours

 

These are the keys to the invisible doors

By rewarding hard work and certain behaviours we believe we are preparing people for the real world and sending a positive message to all involved, kids and adults.

Some Other Ramblings

CALL PAULA FOR A FREE TRIAL 01522 543 787

 

 

 

 

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Stress Levels In Training

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Stress Levels In Training

Stress Levels In Training – A vital area to manage

Stress Levels In Training

 

Stress Levels In Training – An Overview

Stress has its uses in combat, unfortunately, stress has a bad rap these days.

Not enough stress can lead to underperformance in sport and in self-defence can lead to disaster.

Too much stress leads to a shut down of the senses and reflexes. So both ends of the scale are not helpful for combat.

As martial artists, we need to find the sweet spot and that lies around 140BPM heart rate.

Stress Levels In Training – Optimal training

Now if you were about to play Chopin on a piano you need a low heart rate. This is complex motor/muscle movements. You need to be very relaxed

If you were about to deadlift 200 KG you can be at the other end of the scale. This is a gross motor/muscle skill

As mentioned, we martial artists need to be in the middle for optimal performance. 

Stress Levels In Training – Controlling emotion

There are a few tools you can use to help control heart rate. Here are 2.

  1. Meditation – This can help to not get caught up in the emotion. Meditation is an amazing tool to develop mental strength. You see your thoughts and you recognise you are not thinking them. You then develop the skill to not attach to them. Stress levels can go through the roof when confronted by an opponent or a threat. To focus and calm the mind with skills developed through meditation gives you a huge advantage
  2. Sparring – This is sort of obvious though there are a few schools of thought on this. We basically work like this. 100 training sessions are light technical sparring and 1 session is tough intense sparring. So we operate a 100/1 ratio in our sparring classes. This helps develop the skills needed to spar safely and build confidence. After that its simply more time on the mats sparring, keeping that ego in check. Not getting too stressed and overwhelmed.

Stress Levels In Training

We hope this was helpful, in the end there are no shortcuts. More time on the mats surrounded by the right people builds confidence. This helps with stress levels and this improves not only combat but in all of life when mastered.

Other Ramblings you may like on our site

If you’d like a free trial in any of our classes give Paula a call on 01522 543 787

 

 

 

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